Famous Boston Tea Party

247 years ago this week. December 16, 1773 – A great crowd gathered at the Old South Meeting House to hear speeches protesting new taxes on imports, including tea. Shouting “Boston harbor a tea party tonight,” they went down to the nearby docks. Thinly disguised as “Mohawks”, fifty men boarded three East India ships – Dartmouth, Beaver and Eleanor. Breaking open 342 chests of imported tea, they dumped the lot into the harbor. The “Intolerable Acts” soon followed as punishment.

The 247th anniversary is today, Dec 16, 2020. A virtual re-enactment will be hosted tonight at 7PM, by Boston Tea Party Ship. Sign up at this URL: https://www.bostonteapartyship.com/virtual-museum

 

Paul Revere’s ride – photo

Paul Revere © Steve Dunwell

Paul Revere’s famous ride began tonight, April 18, 1775. The “Two if by Sea” lanterns confirmed what he had already learned: that the British troops would cross the Charles River in boats, landing in Cambridge and marching to Concord the next day. Revere crossed the river and road his horse towards Lexington. At the same time, William Dawes road another horse “by land”, via Watertown, to Lexington and Concord. On the following day – the 19th – Patriots and British soldiers clashed at both Lexington and at Concord.This photo shows Mr. Revere, as depicted at the sand castle competition at Revere Beach.

 

Boston Massacre 250th

Boston Massacre re-enactment, Boston, MA Old State HouseThe 250th anniversary of the Boston Massacre is March 5, 2020. Five men were killed by British troops, including Crispus Attucks, an African American, who was the first one hit, and Memorial events include: Granary Burying Ground 9AM Thursday, Old South Meeting House, 7PM Thursday, and a re-enactment Saturday evening at 7PM at the Old State House.

Paul Revere’s ride April 18

Revere statue by Cyrus Dallin

Paul Revere’s famous ride began tonight, April 18, 1775. The “Two if by Sea” lanterns confirmed what he had already learned: that the British troops would cross the Charles River in boats, landing in Cambridge and marching to Concord the next day. Revere crossed the river and road his horse towards Lexington. At the same time, William Dawes road another horse “by land”, via Watertown, to Lexington and Concord. On the following day – the 19th – Patriots and British soldiers clashed at both Lexington and at Concord.

 

British troops leave Boston

Aside

Evacuation Day in Boston marks the departure of the British on March 17, 1776, ending the 11-month “Siege of Boston.” Washington had surprised the British with new fortifications and cannons on Dorchester Heights. The “Evacuation” took troops and Tory citizens to Halifax, NS. Evacuation Day a local holiday In Boston, often combined with St. Patrick’s Day. This broadside by Paul Revere shows the troops arriving by ship in 1775.

Constitution is ratified, June 21

Constitution We the People

On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire ratified the US Constitution;  the 9th state to do so, thus meeting the necessary minimum.  At that point, the Constitution became the Law.

 

Paul Revere midnight ride

Revere statue by Cyrus Dallin

April 18th, 1775, Paul Revere arranged for the lantern signal, then was rowed across the Charles River to begin his midnight ride to Lexington to raise the alarm about the arrival there of British regular soldiers.

Evacuation Day – British leave Boston

Washington at Dorchester Heights

Evacuation Day in Boston marks the departure of the British on March 17, 1776, ending the 11-month “Siege of Boston.” This painting by Gilbert Stuart shows Washington at Dorchester Heights, where he surprised the British with new fortifications and cannons. The “Evacuation” took troops and Tory citizens to Halifax, NS. In Boston, Evacuation Day a local holiday, often combined with St. Patrick’s Day. Dorchester Heights is in South Boston.

Boston Massacre woodcut by Paul Revere

March 5, 1770. A snowy evening. A musket shot is fired. More shooting follows, killing five. This woodcut image by Paul Revere.